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EnglishIs Bitcoin safe from a stuxnet event?

Stuxnet was a computer worm that took out centrifuges in Iran's nuclear facility. I was thinking that a similar attack could happen in multiple Bitcoin mining farms and affect ASIC miners thus a massive disruption on hash rate. Would that be possible? If yes, what measures could be taken to prevent it? More details about Stuxnet can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7g0pi4J8auQ Thanks

PANAGOT 4 weeks ago
    Tags:
  • Stuxnet
  • Bitcoin
  • Mining
  • Worm
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Miss Mike 4 weeks ago
Anything is possible, but 1. Remember, most of all western intelligence was probably responsible for Iranian woes which have not been reliably trained by American Universities since the 1970's. 2. Algorithms can always been updated by the next generation of intrepid, hard working quantum physics laws. 3. Therefore, with these laws in place, ingenuity will ALWAYS outpace outdated governmental, much less banking conglomerates. Carpe diem, carpe monedum.
shaheer 4 weeks ago
check this https://lawreview.law.miami.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Trautman__p761.pdf
Rushabh 2 weeks ago
Cannot say no , Anything can happen .I hope you may know what happened at Fukushima Stuxnet virus led the melt down in the reactor . hope U keep it safe
https://projectcamelotportal.com/2014/02/11/bitcoin-issue-a-stuxnet-like-virus/
Miss Mike 2 weeks ago
Yes, you must always be on guard as I said on my last message. That is the only way. Sorry.
gsdaedra 1 week ago
it is very possible. thus you have to take it at your own risk. multiple teams are woroking to get us the safest crypto we could have.
Ülkü 1 day ago
Mümkün değildir nettt
Gracious Interests 1 day ago
It is safe from such an event.

The reason to this has to do with the underlying blockchain (and its consensus) upon which it operates.
The consensus (Proof-Of-Work) implies hashing power being dedicated to mining. Should a stuxnet-attack occur it will imply the hash rate of the infected miner going down. If by some miracle the hash rate is kept level it still has to deal with the entire global mining community. Changes made to the Bitcoin blockchain must be approved by a majority.. (51%-attack). So even if the virus infected a computer, in order to make a change more then 51% of ALL hashing power of Bitcoin will be needed to make an impact.

Otherwise it gets validated.

Short answer is: Bitcoin is safe from a Stuxnet attack.
Gracious Interests 1 day ago
It is safe from such an event.

The reason to this has to do with the underlying blockchain, and its consensus mechanism, upon which it operates.
The consensus (Proof-Of-Work) implies hashing power being dedicated to mining. Should a Stuxnet-attack occur it will imply the hash rate of the infected miner going down (by running a secondary program demanding its attention).

If by some miracle the hash rate is kept level it still has to deal with the entire global mining community. Changes made to the Bitcoin blockchain must be approved by a majority (51%) of all nodes on the network. One miner is only one node.

So even if the virus infected a computer, in order to make a change more then 51% of ALL hashing power of Bitcoin will be needed to make an impact otherwise it gets invalidated.

Another factor is that there is no one central "machine" nor programming language that miners function on nor is being used by the different miners. Miners are but that, simplified machines with different operating systems and setups that perform calculations. Stuxnet was specific in that it targeted specific programming and machines being used. The variety of programs and operating systems making use of Bitcoin and its blockchain are too varied to make a single virus like Stuxnet.

Short answer is: Bitcoin is safe from a Stuxnet attack.
mervis04 1 day ago
La respuesta es complicadas pero nada fácil El virus se llama BlackEnergyy es el primero en la historia —que conozcamos— involucrado en un apagón eléctrico generalizado. Antes que él, Stuxnet, obra de Israel y Estados Unidos, dañó seriamente diversas centrales nucleares iraníes, pero no dejó a nadie sin luz.BlackEnergy es sólo una de las piezas usadas en el ataque, llevado a cabo por mercenarios informáticos del más alto nivel, lo que hace suponer que quien puede pagar sus salarios tiene mucho dinero, posiblemente un gobierno. Pero, aunque el virus BlackEnergy es de factoría rusa y Ucrania, después de dos años de guerra con Rusia, no duda en señalar a este país como culpable, los expertos no lo confirman ni desmienten porque los atacantes han tapado muy bien sus huellas.
Bong Bong Balboa 4 hours ago
Nothing is safe now from a hacker, but if you have a great team of cyber security maybe it is possible to avoid some attacks